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The Complete List of Books by Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway is an esteemed wordsmith of American literature and his compositions have been extolled for their sincere portrayal of the human experience. His writing style is epitomized by uncomplicated, perspicuous language, and a focus on action and dialogue rather than introspection and depiction. Hemingway's opuses, including novels, short stories, and non-fiction works, have motivated numerous generations of readers and authors alike.

This assemblage encompasses some of Hemingway's most iconic works, beginning with his inaugural novel "The Sun Also Rises," which established him as a momentous voice in modernist literature. "A Farewell to Arms," one of his most cherished novels, chronicles a love story set amidst the milieu of World War I, whereas "For Whom the Bell Tolls" is an engrossing chronicle of wartime heroism set during the Spanish Civil War. Hemingway's short stories, which have been assembled in various volumes, are equally impressive.

"The Snows of Kilimanjaro" and "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" are among his most distinguished works, while "Hills Like White Elephants" remains a timeless classic of the genre.

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The Complete List of Books by Ernest Hemingway
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  • Three Stories & Ten Poems

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1923
    Number of Pages
    74
    Goodreads Rating
    3.31
    Read?
    Three Stories & Ten Poems

    Three Stories & Ten Poems, Ernest Hemingway’s first book, contains two stories that were all that remained of Hemingway’s first collection after the suitcase containing the originals was famously lost or stolen in 1922. “Up in Michigan,” which was controversial in its time for its explicit sexuality, continues to stir debate and discussion. Gertrude Stein pronounced it “inaccrochable” while Irish novelist Edna O’Brien said, “I would ask his detractors, female or male, just to read that story, and could you in all honor say this was a writer who didn’t understand women’s emotions and hated women?” Spare, unblinking, and compelling, this slender collection marks the debut of one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century.

    1
    1923
    1923
  • Big Two-Hearted River

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1925
    Number of Pages
    32
    Goodreads Rating
    3.83
    Read?
    Big Two-Hearted River

    In this stunning new edition of "Big Two-Hearted River", Ernest Hemingway's 1925 classic story about war, trauma, grief, and wilderness comes to life again for a modern generation. Perhaps more relevant now than at any previous time, this tale about the adolescent Nick Adam's fishing trip to northern Michigan's Fox River takes a life of its own in a beautiful new format. The perfect companion for a fly-fishing trip or a craft brew aficionado's club as much as a book study, this beautiful work never seizes to impress new generations with the power of its prose. Now published here again for a new audience, the editor offers this story and its power to a world more in need than ever of its message.

    2
    1925
    1925
  • In Our Time

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1925
    Number of Pages
    104
    Goodreads Rating
    3.76
    Read?
    In Our Time

    In Our Time is Ernest Hemingway's first collection of short stories, published in 1925. Its title is derived from the English Book of Common Prayer, "Give peace in our time, O Lord". The collection's publication history was complex. It began with six prose vignettes commissioned by Ezra Pound for a 1923 edition of The Little Review; Hemingway added twelve more and in 1924 compiled the in our time edition (with a lower-case title), which was printed in Paris. To these were added fourteen short stories for the 1925 edition, including "Indian Camp" and "Big Two-Hearted River", two of his best-known Nick Adams stories.

    The stories' themes – of alienation, loss, grief, separation – continue the work Hemingway began with the vignettes, which include descriptions of acts of war, bullfighting and current events. The collection is known for its spare language and oblique depiction of emotion, through a style known as Hemingway's "theory of omission" (iceberg theory).

    3
    1925
    1925
  • The Sun Also Rises

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1926
    Number of Pages
    320
    Goodreads Rating
    3.80
    Read?
    The Sun Also Rises

    American Journalist Jake Barnes is desperately in love with the beautiful Lady Brett Ashley. She moves seductively through the seemingly glamorous milieu of American and British expats, loving, living and partying in Paris in the 1920's. They're a hedonistic generation, marked by the violence and privations of WW1, in pursuit of adventure.Part of the Macmillan Collector’s Library; a series of stunning, cloth-bound, pocket-sized classics with gold foiled edges and ribbon markers. These beautiful books make perfect gifts or a treat for any book lover.Ever restless, Jake and Lady Brett travel together with a disparate group of friends through France to Pamplona in Spain. There they are taken up by the vitality and the spectacle of the famous Fiesta of St Fermin. In a city famous for its bullfighting, Jake is plagued by jealousy and real love seems forever out of reach. The drama of the bullfighting is captured on the page by Hemingway with brutal realism in a remarkable novel that secured his place as an astonishing new writer and a voice for his generation.

    4
    1926
    1926
  • A Clean Well Lighted Place

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1926
    Number of Pages
    30
    Goodreads Rating
    4.12
    Read?
    A Clean Well Lighted Place

    Late in the night, inside a Spanish cafe, an old man drinks brandy. A young waiter is angry; he wishes that the old man would leave so that he and an older waiter could close the cafe and go home. He insults the deaf old man and is painfully indifferent to the older waiter's feelings when he states that "an old man is a nasty thing." The older waiter, however, realizes that the old man drinking brandy after brandy is not nasty; he is only lonely. No doubt, that's the reason why the old man tried to hang himself last week.When the old man leaves, the waiters close the cafe. The young waiter leaves for home, and the older waiter walks to an all-night cafe where, thinking about the terrible emptiness of the old man's life which he keenly identifies with, he orders a cup of nada from the waiter. A cup of nothing. The man who takes the order thinks that the old waiter is just another crazy old man; he brings him coffee.

    5
    1926
    1926
  • The Torrents of Spring

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1926
    Number of Pages
    80
    Goodreads Rating
    3.13
    Read?
    The Torrents of Spring

    Set in northern Michigan, The Torrents of Spring concerns two men who work at a pump factory: World War I veteran Yogi Johnson, and writer Scripps O'Neill. Both are searching for the perfect woman, though they disagree over this ideal. The story begins with O'Neill returning home from the library to find that his wife and small daughter have left him, explaining that "It takes a lot to mend the walls of fate." O'Neill, desperate for companionship, befriends a British waitress, Diana, at the restaurant where she works and immediately asks her to marry him. Diana makes an attempt to impress her spouse by reading books from the lists of The New York Times Book Review, including many forgotten pot-boilers of the 1920s. But O'Neill soon leaves her (as she feared he would when she first met him) for another waitress, Mandy, who enthralls him with her store of literary (but possibly made up) anecdotes. Yogi Johnson has a period during which he anguishes over the fact that he doesn't seem to desire any woman at all, even though spring is approaching, "which turns a young man's fancy to love." At last, he falls in love with an Indigenous American woman who enters a restaurant clothed only in moccasins, the wife of one of the two Indigenous Americans he befriends near the end of the story, in the penultimate chapter. Johnson is cured of his impotence when, viewing the naked woman, he is overcome by "a new feeling" which he hastens to attribute to Mother Nature, and together they "light out for the territories."

    6
    1926
    1926
  • An Alpine Idyll

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1927
    Number of Pages
    Goodreads Rating
    3.16
    Read?
    An Alpine Idyll

    A mature Nick and a friend, John, return from a ski trip to Galtur. The story takes place in spring, with the characters noting that the season was not good for skiing and lamenting that they had stayed in Silvretta Alps too long. The story begins with Nick and John witnessing a peasant burial. The story concludes with Nick and John, who had gone into an inn for drinks, having a discussion with the innkeeper and the sexton who had performed the burial. There is a revelation that the peasant widower, who had been snowbound with his dead wife for months, had reportedly kept her body in the woodshed and used her mouth to hold a lantern. The characters wonder whether the story was true, and the innkeeper indicated it must have been, since the peasants were "beasts."

    7
    1927
    1927
  • Men Without Women

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1927
    Number of Pages
    162
    Goodreads Rating
    3.62
    Read?
    Men Without Women

    This collection of short stories presents Hemingway in his most characteristic moods, illustrating particularly his concern with the fighting side of man nature. It contains stories on many of his best themes. The Undefeated is a penetrating study of the mentality of the bullfighter, ending with a tense description of the struggle in which he is gored. Another, Fifty Grand, creates in this same immediate manner the world of the professional boxer. Many of the others, some of them illustrating Hemingway's remarkable gift for catching the essence of a situation in a few brief paragraphs, are set in Italy and connected with the army, the War, or Americans. He achieves some unforgettable reporting of the world in which blood is argument. The author's exceptional gift of narrative quality gives the excitement of a well-told tale to what is, in fact, a simple description of a scene.

    8
    1927
    1927
  • The Killers and Other Short Stories

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1927
    Number of Pages
    Goodreads Rating
    3.39
    Read?
    The Killers and Other Short Stories
    9
    1927
    1927
  • A Farewell To Arms

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1929
    Number of Pages
    251
    Goodreads Rating
    3.81
    Read?
    A Farewell To Arms

    A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Set against the looming horrors of the battlefield - the weary, demoralized men marching in the rain during the German attack on Caporetto; the profound struggle between loyalty and desertion—this gripping, semiautobiographical work captures the harsh realities of war and the pain of lovers caught in its inexorable sweep. Ernest Hemingway famously said that he rewrote his ending to A Farewell to Arms thirty-nine times to get the words right.

    10
    1929
    1929
  • Death in the Afternoon

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    1932
    Number of Pages
    496
    Goodreads Rating
    3.69
    Read?
    Death in the Afternoon

    Ernest Hemingway's classic exploration of the history and pageantry of bullfighting, and the deeper themes of cowardice, bravery, sport and tragedy that it inspires.Still considered one of the best books ever written about bullfighting, Death in the Afternoon reflects Hemingway's belief that bullfighting was more than mere sport. Here he describes and explains the technical aspects of this dangerous ritual, and "the emotional and spiritual intensity and pure classic beauty that can be produced by a man, an animal, and a piece of scarlet serge draped on a stick." Seen through his eyes, bullfighting becomes an art, a richly choreographed ballet, with performers who range from awkward amateurs to masters of great grace and cunning.A fascinating look at the history and grandeur of bullfighting, Death in the Afternoon is also a deeper contemplation on the nature of cowardice and bravery, sport and tragedy, and is enlivened throughout by Hemingway's pungent commentary on life and literature.

    11
    1932
    1932
  • Winner Take Nothing

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1933
    Number of Pages
    176
    Goodreads Rating
    3.71
    Read?
    Winner Take Nothing

    Written when Hemingway was at the height of his creative powers, the stories in "Winner Take Nothing" glow with the mark of his unique talent. Hunters, wives, old men of wisdom, waiters, fighters, women loved, women lost: they are all here, living on the raw edge, making love, facing the inevitable reality of death. The characters, the dialogue, the settings, the remarkable insight could have come only from Hemingway's imagination. As an introduction to his work, or as an overview of the themes he developed at greater length in his novels, it is a stunningly successful collection.

    12
    1933
    1933
  • Green Hills of Africa

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    1935
    Number of Pages
    320
    Goodreads Rating
    3.55
    Read?
    Green Hills of Africa

    The most intimate and elaborately enhanced addition to the Hemingway Library series: Hemingway’s memoir of his safari across the Serengeti—presented with archival material from the Hemingway Collection at the John F. Kennedy Library and with the never-before-published safari journal of Hemingway’s second wife, Pauline Pfeiffer.When it was first published in 1935, The New York Times called Green Hills of Africa, “The best-written story of big-game hunting anywhere,” Hemingway’s evocative account of his safari through East Africa with his wife, Pauline Pfeiffer, captures his fascination with big-game hunting. In examining the grace of the chase and the ferocity of the kill, Hemingway looks inward, seeking to explain the lure of the hunt and the primal undercurrent that comes alive on the plains of Africa. Green Hills of Africa is also an impassioned portrait of the glory of the African landscape and the beauty of a wilderness that was, even then, being threatened by the incursions of man.This new Hemingway Library Edition offers a fresh perspective on Hemingway’s classic travelogue, with a personal foreword by Patrick Hemingway, the author’s sole surviving son, who spent many years as a professional hunter in East Africa; a new introduction by Seán Hemingway, grandson of the author; and, published for the first time in its entirety, the African journal of Hemingway’s wife, Pauline, which offers an intimate glimpse into thoughts and experiences that shaped her husband’s craft.

    13
    1935
    1935
  • The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber & Other Stories

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    1936
    Number of Pages
    192
    Goodreads Rating
    4.02
    Read?
    The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber & Other Stories

    "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" is a short story set in Africa. It was published in the September 1936 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine concurrently with "The Snows of Kilimanjaro."

    14
    1936
    1936
  • To Have and Have Not

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1937
    Number of Pages
    272
    Goodreads Rating
    3.53
    Read?
    To Have and Have Not

    To Have and Have Not is the dramatic story of Harry Morgan, an honest man who is forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West as a means of keeping his crumbling family financially afloat. His adventures lead him into the world of the wealthy and dissipated yachtsmen who throng the region and involve him in a strange and unlikely love affair.In this harshly realistic, yet oddly tender and wise novel, Hemingway perceptively delineates the personal struggles of both the "haves" and the "have nots" and creates one of the most subtle and moving portraits of a love affair in his oeuvre. By turns funny and tragic, lively and poetic, remarkable in its emotional impact, To Have and Have Not is literary high adventure at its finest.

    15
    1937
    1937
  • The Fifth Column and Four Stories of the Spanish Civil War

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1938
    Number of Pages
    192
    Goodreads Rating
    3.57
    Read?
    The Fifth Column and Four Stories of the Spanish Civil War

    Featuring Hemingway's only full-length play, which--like the stories here--grew out of his experiences in and around a besieged Madrid, this volume brilliantly evokes the tumultuous years of the Spanish Civil War. These works, which grew from Hemingway's adventures as a newspaper correspondent in and around besieged Madrid, movingly portray the effects of war on soldiers, civilians, and the correspondents sent to cover it.

    16
    1938
    1938
  • The First Forty-Nine Stories

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1938
    Number of Pages
    416
    Goodreads Rating
    4.18
    Read?
    The First Forty-Nine Stories

    From Ernest Hemingway's Preface: 'There are many kinds of stories in this book. I hope you will find some that you like- In going where you have to go, and doing what you have to do, and seeing what you have to see, you dull and blunt the instrument you write with. But I would rather have it bent and dulled and know I had to put it on the grindstone and hammer it into shape and put a whetstone to it, and know that I had something to write about, than to have it bright and shining, and nothing to say, or smooth and well-oiled in the closet, but unused.'A collection of Hemingway's first forty-nine short stories, featuring a brief introduction by the author and lesser known as well as familiar tales, including 'Up in Michigan', 'Fifty Grand', and 'The Light of the World', and the Snows of Kilimanjaro, Winner Take Nothing' and Men Without Women collections.

    17
    1938
    1938
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1940
    Number of Pages
    312
    Goodreads Rating
    3.98
    Read?
    For Whom the Bell Tolls

    High in the Spanish Sierra, a guerrilla band prepares to blow up a vital bridge. Robert Jordan, a young American, has been sent to handle the dynamiting. There he finds the intense comradeship of war. And there he finds Maria who has escaped from Franco’s rebels.

    18
    1940
    1940
  • Across the River and into the Trees

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1950
    Number of Pages
    272
    Goodreads Rating
    3.31
    Read?
    Across the River and into the Trees

    A poignant tale of a revitalizing love that is found too late—the fleeting connection between an Italian countess and an injured American colonel inspires light and hope, while only darkness lies ahead.In the fall of 1948, Ernest Hemingway made his first extended visit to Italy in thirty years. His reacquaintance with Venice, a city he loved, provided the inspiration for Across the River and into the Trees, the story of Richard Cantwell, a war-ravaged American colonel stationed in Italy at the close of the Second World War, and his love for a young Italian countess.A bittersweet homage to love that overpowers reason, to the resilience of the human spirit, and to the world-weary beauty and majesty of Venice, Across the River and into the Trees stands as Hemingway's statement of defiance in response to the great dehumanizing atrocities of the Second World War.

    19
    1950
    1950
  • The Old Man and the Sea

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1952
    Number of Pages
    128
    Goodreads Rating
    3.80
    Read?
    The Old Man and the Sea

    It is the story of an old Cuban fisherman and his supreme ordeal: a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream. Using the simple, powerful language of a fable, Hemingway takes the timeless themes of courage in the face of defeat and personal triumph won from loss and transforms them into a magnificent twentieth-century classic.

    20
    1952
    1952
  • The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1964
    Number of Pages
    160
    Goodreads Rating
    3.84
    Read?
    The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories

    In these Hemingway stories, which are partly autobiographical, men and women of passion live, fight, love and die in scenes of dramatic intensity. They range from hauntingly tragedy on the snow-capped peak of Kilimanjaro, to brutal America with its deceptive calm, and war-ravaged Europe.

    21
    1964
    1964
  • A Moveable Feast

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1964
    Number of Pages
    256
    Goodreads Rating
    4.03
    Read?
    A Moveable Feast

    Hemingway's memories of his life as an unknown writer living in Paris in the twenties are deeply personal, warmly affectionate, and full of wit. Looking back not only at his own much younger self, but also at the other writers who shared Paris with him - James Joyce, Wyndham Lewis, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald - he recalls the time when, poor, happy, and writing in cafes, he discovered his vocation. Written during the last years of Hemingway's life, his memoir is a lively and powerful reflection of his genius that scintillates with the romance of the city.

    22
    1964
    1964
  • The Nick Adams Stories

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1966
    Number of Pages
    272
    Goodreads Rating
    4.03
    Read?
    The Nick Adams Stories

    The complete collection of Ernest Hemingway's Nick Adams two dozen stories are gathered here in one volume, grouped together according to the major time periods in the protagonist's life. Based on Hemingway's own experiences as a boy and as a member of the Red Cross ambulance corps in World War I. The collection follows Nick's life as a child to parent, along with soldier, veteran, and writer and feature some of Hemingway's earliest work such as "Indian Camp" and some of his best-known short stories, including "Big Two-Hearted River." Perfect for longtime Hemingway fans and as an introduction to one of America's most famous writers.

    23
    1966
    1966
  • Islands in the Stream

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1970
    Number of Pages
    448
    Goodreads Rating
    3.88
    Read?
    Islands in the Stream

    Beginning in the 1930s, Islands in the Stream follows the fortunes of Thomas Hudson from his experiences as a painter on the Gulf Stream island of Bimini, where his loneliness is broken by the vacation visit of his three young sons, to his antisubmarine activities off the coast of Cuba during World War II. The greater part of the story takes place in a Havana bar, where a wildly diverse cast of characters — including an aging prostitute who stands out as one of Hemingway's most vivid creations — engages in incomparably rich dialogue. A brilliant portrait of the inner life of a complex and endlessly intriguing man, Islands in the Stream is Hemingway at his mature best.

    24
    1970
    1970
  • Selected Letters 1917-1961

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    1981
    Number of Pages
    976
    Goodreads Rating
    4.15
    Read?
    Selected Letters 1917-1961

    Almost 600 letters written by Ernest Hemingway between 1917 and 1961 that provide an intimate portrait of one of the most original and influential American writers.While many people are familiar with the public image of Hemingway and the legendary accounts of his life, few knew him as an intimate. With this collection of letters, a new Hemingway emerges. Ranging from 1917 to 1961, this generous selection of nearly six hundred letters is, in effect, both a self-portrait and an autobiography. In his own words, Hemingway candidly reveals himself to a wide variety of people: family, friends, enemies, editors, translators, and almost all the prominent writers of his day. In so doing he proves to be one of the most entertaining letter writers of all time.Carlos Baker has chosen letters that not only represent major turning points in Hemingway's career but also exhibit character, wit, and the writer's typical enthusiasm for hunting, fishing, drinking, and eating. A few are ingratiating, some downright truculent. Others present his views on writing and reading, criticize books by friend or foe, and discuss women, soldiers, politicians, and prizefighters. Perhaps more than anything, these letters show Hemingway's irrepressible humor, given far freer rein in his correspondence than in his books. An informal biography in letters, the product of forty-five years' living and writing, Ernest Hemingway: Selected Letters leaves an indelible impression of an extraordinary man.

    25
    1981
    1981
  • Ernest Hemingway on Writing

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    1984
    Number of Pages
    160
    Goodreads Rating
    4.04
    Read?
    Ernest Hemingway on Writing

    An assemblage of reflections on the nature of writing and the writer from one the greatest American writers of the twentieth century.Throughout Hemingway’s career as a writer, he maintained that it was bad luck to talk about writing—that it takes off “whatever butterflies have on their wings and the arrangement of hawk’s feathers if you show it or talk about it.”Despite this belief, by the end of his life he had done just what he intended not to do. In his novels and stories, in letters to editors, friends, fellow artists, and critics, in interviews and in commissioned articles on the subject, Hemingway wrote often about writing. And he wrote as well and as incisively about the subject as any writer who ever lived…This book contains Hemingway’s reflections on the nature of the writer and on elements of the writer’s life, including specific and helpful advice to writers on the craft of writing, work habits, and discipline. The Hemingway personality comes through in general wisdom, wit, humor, and insight, and in his insistence on the integrity of the writer and of the profession itself.—From the Preface by Larry W. Phillips

    26
    1984
    1984
  • The Dangerous Summer

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1985
    Number of Pages
    256
    Goodreads Rating
    3.66
    Read?
    The Dangerous Summer

    In the 1950s, Hemingway and his wife return to Spain, where Hemingway had visited before as a war correspondent to cover the Spanish Civil War, in order to see friends and follow bullfighting events. Hemingway’s time in Spain is most often remembered as his experiences with bullfighting, his passion often conveyed through his writing. He and his wife follow summer-long series events and witness the complexities and danger within the bullfighting community.In this vivid account, Hemingway captures the exhausting pace and pressure of the season, the camaraderie and pride of the matadors, and the mortal drama as in fight after fight the rival matadors try to outdo each other with ever more daring performances. At the same time, Hemingway offers an often complex and deeply personal self-portrait that reveals much about one of the twentieth century's preeminent writers.

    27
    1985
    1985
  • Dateline: Toronto

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    1985
    Number of Pages
    478
    Goodreads Rating
    3.92
    Read?
    Dateline: Toronto

    Dateline: Toronto collects all 172 pieces that Hemingway published in the Star, including those under pseudonyms.Hemingway readers will discern his unique voice already present in many of these journalistic pieces, particularly his knack for dialogue. It is also fascinating to discover early reportorial accounts of events and subjects that figure in his later fiction. As William White points out in his introduction to this work, “Much of it, over sixty years later, can still be read both as a record of the early twenties and as evidence of how Ernest Hemingway learned the craft of writing.” The enthusiasm, wit, and skill with which these pieces were written guarantee that Dateline: Toronto will be read for pleasure, as excellent journalism, and for the insights it gives to Hemingway's works.

    28
    1985
    1985
  • Conversations with Ernest Hemingway

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    1986
    Number of Pages
    204
    Goodreads Rating
    4.16
    Read?
    Conversations with Ernest Hemingway

    Collections of interviews with notable modern writers.

    29
    1986
    1986
  • The Garden of Eden

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    1986
    Number of Pages
    248
    Goodreads Rating
    3.72
    Read?
    The Garden of Eden

    Set on the Côte d'Azur in the 1920s, it is the story of a young American writer, David Bourne, his glamorous wife, Catherine, and the dangerous, erotic game they play when they fall in love with the same woman.

    30
    1986
    1986
  • The Complete Short Stories

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    1987
    Number of Pages
    650
    Goodreads Rating
    4.29
    Read?
    The Complete Short Stories

    In this definitive collection of the Nobel Prize-winning author’s short stories, readers will delight in Hemingway’s most beloved classics such as "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," "Hills Like White Elephants," and "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," and will discover seven new tales published for the first time in this collection, totaling in sixty stories. This collection demonstrates Hemingway’s ability to write beautiful prose for each distinct story, with plots that range from experiences of World War II to beautifully touching moments between a father and son. For Hemingway fans, The Complete Short Stories is an invaluable treasury.

    31
    1987
    1987
  • Hemingway at Oak Park High

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    1993
    Number of Pages
    128
    Goodreads Rating
    3.00
    Read?
    32
    1993
    1993
  • True At First Light

    Type
    • Book
    Year of Release
    2000
    Number of Pages
    320
    Goodreads Rating
    3.35
    Read?
    True At First Light

    A blend of autobiography and fiction, the book opens on the day his close friend Pop, a celebrated hunter, leaves Ernest in charge of the safari camp and news arrives of a potential attack from a hostile tribe. Drama continues to build as his wife, Mary, pursues the great black-maned lion that has become her obsession, and Ernest becomes involved with a young African girl whom he supposedly plans to take as a second bride. Increasingly enchanted by the local African community, he struggles between the attraction of these two women and the wildly different cultures they represent.Spicing his depictions of human longings with sharp humor, Hemingway captures the excitement of big-game hunting and the unparalleled beauty of the landscape. Rich in laughter, beauty, and profound insight. True at First Light is an extraordinary publishing event—a breathtaking final work from one of our most beloved and important writers.

    33
    2000
    2000
  • Hemingway on Fishing

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    2000
    Number of Pages
    272
    Goodreads Rating
    4.01
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    Hemingway on Fishing

    The first and only collection of the Nobel Prize-winning author’s writings on America's great passion—fishing—introduced and edited by Nick Lyons with a foreword by Jack Hemingway.From childhood on, Ernest Hemingway was a passionate fisherman. He fished the lakes and creeks near the family’s summer home at Walloon Lake, Michigan, and his first stories and pieces of journalism were often about his favorite sport. Here, collected for the first time in one volume, are all of his great writings about the many kinds of fishing he did—from angling for trout in the rivers of northern Michigan to fishing for marlin in the Gulf Stream.In A Moveable Feast, Hemingway speaks of sitting in a café in Paris and writing about what he knew best—and when it came time to stop, he “did not want to leave the river.” The story was the unforgettable classic, “Big Two-Hearted River,” and from its first words we do not want to leave the river either. He also wrote articles for the Toronto Star on fishing in Canada and Europe and, later, articles for Esquire about his growing passion for big-game fishing. His last books, The Old Man and the Sea and Islands in the Stream, celebrate his vast knowledge of the ocean and his affection for its great denizens.Hemingway on Fishing is an encompassing, diverse, and fascinating collection. From the early Nick Adams stories and the memorable chapters on fishing the Irati River in The Sun Also Rises to such late novels as Islands in the Stream, this collection traces the evolution of a great writer's passion; the range of his interests; the sure use he made of fishing, transforming it into the stuff of great literature.Anglers and lovers of great writing alike will welcome this important collection.

    34
    2000
    2000
  • Hemingway on War

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    2003
    Number of Pages
    284
    Goodreads Rating
    3.91
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    Hemingway on War

    Ernest Hemingway’s most important writings on war—perhaps the author’s greatest subject—are brought together in a single volume, introduced and edited by his grandson, Seán Hemingway, with a foreword by his son, Patrick Hemingway.Ernest Hemingway witnessed many of the seminal conflicts of the twentieth century—from his post as a Red Cross ambulance driver during World War I to his nearly twenty-five years as a war correspondent for The Toronto Star—and he recorded them with matchless power. This landmark volume brings together Hemingway’s most important and timeless writings about the nature of human combat.Passages from his beloved World War I novel, A Farewell to Arms, and For Whom the Bell Tolls, about the Spanish Civil War, offer an unparalleled portrayal of the physical and psychological impact of war and its aftermath. Selections from Across the River and into the Trees vividly evoke an emotionally scarred career soldier in the twilight of life as he reflects on the nature of war. Classic short stories, such as “In Another Country” and “The Butterfly and the Tank,” stand alongside excerpts from Hemingway’s first book of short stories, In Our Time, and his only full-length play, The Fifth Column.With captivating selections from Hemingway’s journalism—from his coverage of the Greco-Turkish War of 1919–22 to a legendary early interview with Mussolini to his jolting eyewitness account of the Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944—Hemingway on War collects the author’s most penetrating chronicles of perseverance and defeat, courage and fear, and love and loss in the midst of modern warfare.

    35
    2003
    2003
  • Under Kilimanjaro

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    2005
    Number of Pages
    472
    Goodreads Rating
    3.54
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    Under Kilimanjaro

    Accompanied by his fourth wife Mary, famed American novelist Ernest Hemingway spent several months in late 1953 and early 1954 on his final safari in Kenya. Their time there came to an abrupt end in early January 1954 when they sustained serious injuries from two near-fatal plane crashes in east Africa. While recovering, and back home in Havana, Hemingway wrote his “African book,” which is, by turns, an adventuresome, comedic, and thoughtful recounting of his final safari. In Under Kilimanjaro “Papa” colors real people and events with his lively imagination as he demonstrates his inimitable style, his deft wit, and his intelligent curiosity in this autobiographical novel about the land and people he came to love.

    36
    2005
    2005
  • On Paris

    Type
    • Nonfiction
    Year of Release
    2008
    Number of Pages
    80
    Goodreads Rating
    3.87
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    On Paris

    Writing with characteristic verve, the author tackles cultural topics in chapters such as Living on $1,000 a Year in Paris, American Bohemians in Paris, and Parisian Boorishness. "The scum of Greenwich Village, New York, has been skimmed off and deposited in large ladles on that section of Paris adjacent to the Café Rotonde. New scum, of course, has risen to take the place of the old, but the oldest scum, the thickest scum and the scummiest scum," Hemingway wryly observes, "has come across the ocean, somehow, and with its afternoon and evening levees has made the Rotonde the leading Latin Quarter showplace for tourists in search of atmosphere."

    37
    2008
    2008
  • Camping Out

    Type
    • Short Story
    Year of Release
    2014
    Number of Pages
    32
    Goodreads Rating
    4.04
    Read?
    Camping Out

    In this piece from 1920―originally published as a newspaper article in the Toronto Daily Star―a young Ernest Hemingway provides solid advice to the novice camper. In his typically succinct style, Hemingway gives tips on bug avoidance, bed preparation, and offers expert outdoor cooking instructions. Any city man enjoying an open-air vacation who follows Hemingway’s advice “ought to be able to sleep comfortably every night, to eat well every day and to return to the city rested and in good condition.” This short work is part of Applewood’s “American Roots,” series, tactile mementos of American passions by some of America’s most famous writers.

    38
    2014
    2014